Browsing Tag

third graders

Multiplication

I’m starting to teach multiplication strategies this week! It is one of my favorite units of the year. I use four strategies to teach multiplication when we first start our unit: equal groups, drawing arrays, repeated addition, and skip counting.

 

First, I always start with equal groups.

Second, we learn how to draw an array.

Third, we talk about how multiplication is the same as repeated addition.

Last, I teach my class how to skip count.

Skip counting is the method I like them to use ALL year long. The other three methods are great for the beginning, but in the months to come, skip counting is what helps them get the most quick and accurate answers. It also helps them transition and memorize their multiplication facts quicker!

During each unit, I teach my mini-lesson and whole group lesson on Monday. This means we glue each of the strategies into our interactive notebooks on Mondays. We also do some independent practice that day. This helps me decide who will be in each of my groups during math centers the rest of the week (Tuesday through Friday). For the rest of the week, they get to play games and enjoy math centers that help practice the skills we learned on Monday.

Third Grade September Math Centers

I also include some of my Third Grade September Math Centers in my rotations to help spiral review the skills we learned earlier in the year.

Additional Math Centers

I also use these multiplication math centers that practice all of the strategies we have learned. They are easy to understand and great for extra practice.

Skip Counting Posters

I also put up skip counting posters on the wall during the first two months of our multiplication unit as something the kids can refer to as a reference. This helps them start to learn the skip counting sequences by heart.

Other Games

I also want to mention two games that are perfect for teaching multiplication strategies! The first one is called Back to School Problems: Multiplication Strategies. Students have to collect school supplies each time they solve a multiplication equation.

The second game is called Introduction to Multiplication Strategies Sort. The students sort the cards of equal groups, arrays, picture forms, and repeated addition equations to match the correct multiplication equations.

Multiplication Quizzes

After we’ve been practicing these methods for several weeks, I also introduce them to our multiplication fact quizzes because these quizzes help show me who is starting to learn their facts and who needs more practice. I also have an ice cream party with my class at the end of the year for anyone who passes all of their multiplication facts (passing their division facts earns them extra toppings too!).

Finally, here are links to all of the products I talked about above!

How I Teach Multiplication Using Equal Groups

How I Teach Multiplication Using Arrays

How I Teach Multiplication Using Repeated Addition

How I Teach Multiplication Using Skip Counting

Multiplication Strategies BUNDLE!

Third Grade September Math Centers

Multiplication (3.OA.1) Centers

Skip Counting Posters

Multiplication Quizzes

Back to School: School Supply Problems Multiplication Strategies Game 

Intro to Multiplication Strategies Math Sort

 

 

How do you teach multiplication each year because I’d love to hear about it!

Math, Uncategorized

Third Grade Math Standards

Today, I’m talking about how I teach the third grade Common Core Math Standards each year. This is my fourth year teaching third grade and I feel like I have finally structured the Third Grade Math Standards the way that makes the most sense logically. I’ve also created a math unit  and games for each math standard that I’ll be sharing!

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Click the hyper-linked pink words to take you to each math unit!

Week 1: Place Value + Addition and Subtraction w/No Regrouping (3.NBT.2)
Week 2: Add and Subtract with Regrouping (3.NBT.2)
Week 3: Rounding to the Nearest Ten and Hundred(3.NBT.1)
Week 4: Geometry (3.G.1)
Week 5: Geometry (3.G.1)
Week 6: Multiplication Strategies: Arrays, Repeated Addition, Equal Groupings, and Skip Counting (3.OA.1)
Week 7: Division Strategies: Repeated Subtraction, Equal Groupings, Skip Counting, and Fact Families (3.OA.2 + 3.OA.6)
Week 8: Fact Families and Unknown Factors (3.OA.4 + 3.OA.6)
Week 9: Multiplication and Division Word Problems (3.OA.3)
Week 10: Multiplication Fact Practice (3.OA.7)
Week 11: Division Fact Practice (3.OA.7)
Week 12: Multiples of 10 (3.NBT.3)
Week 13: Properties of Multiplication and Division (3.OA.5)
Week 14: 2 Step Word Problems (3.OA.8)
Week 15: 2 Step Word Problems (3.OA.8)
Week 16: Patterns (3.OA.9)
Week 17: Pictographs and Bar Graphs (3.MD.3)
Week 18: Measure to Nearest ¼ Inch with Ruler (3.MD.4)
Week 19: Tiling with Area/Multiplying to Find Area (3.MD.5+3.MD.6+3.MD.7a+3.MD.7b)
Week 20: Rectilinear Area(3.MD.7d)
Week 21: Perimeter (3.MD.8)
Week 22: Find Unknown Side Length Given Area or Perimeter (3.MD.8) +Area and Perimeter Word Problems
Week 23: Identify and Partition Fractions (3.NF.1 and 3.G.2)
Week 24: Putting Fractions on a Number Line+ Distance Between Fractions on Number Lines (3.NF.2)
Week 25: Equivalent Fractions (3.NF.3a,b)
Week 26: Comparing Fractions (3.NF.3d)
Week 27: Fractions as Whole Numbers (3.NF.3c)
Week 28: Telling Time (3.MD.1)
Week 29: Elapsed Time (3.MD.1)
Week 30: Units of Measurement (grams/kilograms + liters/milliliters) (3.MD.2)
Week 31: Line Plots (3.MD.4)
Week 32: Review –Multiple Choice (All Standards)
Week 33: Review– Multiple Choice (All Standards)
Week 34: Review—Multiple Choice (All Standards)

If there isn’t a hyperlink on one of the weeks, it means I’m still in the process of creating those math units.

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3rd Grade Math Homework

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Two years ago, I spent about six months creating the perfect homework for my third grade students to review all of these essential skills. Each page has 10 problems of NEW material on the front and ten problems of SPIRAL material on the back so students are practicing all concepts taught on a weekly basis.

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I have now used it for a whole year and the results in my class were amazing. I love it and I think you will too!

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It’s available by quarter or you can get the entire year BUNDLE for 20% off! Check out the first week for FREE here!

 

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Math, Uncategorized

Favorite Third Grade Read Alouds

Read aloud is one of my favorite parts of our daily schedule. I believe that it truly helps my students form a love for reading and a love for learning. It is so important for students, no matter what age they are, to have literature read-aloud to them. In my classroom, I choose books that are both engaging and purposeful to help my students learn the standards while enjoying themselves at the same time. Today, I’m talking about my favorite third grade read alouds.

Over the past few years, I have read-aloud many books to my students. Some have been more exciting than others. That’s why I have put together a list for you of ten books that my third grade students absolutely love year after year. Here are my favorite third grade read alouds:

#1: The Doll People

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This series is amazing. It’s written by the same woman who wrote The Babysitters Club series along with Laura Godwin. It’s a wonderful book about dolls that come to life when the humans are away, and it’s captured the hearts of my students year after year without fail. Some years, we read the sequels as well depending on how much time I have. My third graders are captivated by the story of Annabelle Doll and her family as they go on adventures around the house, to the local school, and even on a boat in the last book!

#2: My Weird School

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Dan Gutman is a fantastic writer who my third graders adore. Every year, I read the first book out loud during out unit on character traits. We discuss what character traits we see in Miss Daisy (the teacher). I own the entire My Weird School series so after I start reading the first book, I assign each student in my class a My Weird School book to read on their own throughout the rest of our unit. They have to find the character traits that best describe the main character in the particular book they are reading.

#3: Marvin Redpost: Kidnapped at Birth? 

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A lot of my students have already heard of There’s a Boy in the Girl’s Bathroom  or Sideways Stories from Wayside School  by the time they get to my classroom. However, they haven’t heard about Marvin Redpost. The first in the series, Kidnapped at Birth?, is about a boy named Marvin who believes he may be the king’s long lost son because he has the same hair color as him. It’s a short, funny chapter book with a mysterious twist that gets my reluctant readers hooked and they end up wanting to read the rest of the series on their own.

#4: Bunnicula

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This book is great for third graders around Halloween. It’s told from the perspective of a dog named Harold. He lives with a cat named chester and a family of four humans. One day, the family get a new pet bunny and that’s when strange things start to happen. The vegetables in the fridge start to change colors, the rabbit only wakes up at night, and he’s not a fan of garlic. Could Bunnicula the rabbit be…a vampire? This book is a mysterious comedy that my students laugh out loud at every year.

#5: The Kingdom of Wrenly

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Every year, I really like to read a book that is geared towards my lower-leveled readers. I mostly read book series aloud to allow my students exposure to new books and get ideas about subjects they’re interested in. I read this book to my class each year because it’s a short, high-interest beginning chapter book that all of my students can enjoy and pick up the rest of the series after I’ve finished. It has pictures on nearly every page and is about a prince and his friend that go on adventures around a magical kingdom. At this point in time, there are nine books out so far.

#6: National Geographic Chapters

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I am a big fan of National Geographic Chapters for kids. This is my first non-fiction read aloud each year and it’s great for the students in my class that don’t pick up non-fiction books on a regular basis. There is an entire series of these. Each book is about different animals who do extraordinary things. They are true stories that the kids love to hear. I always hear murmurs of disappointment each time I stop reading one of these. I’ve read a different National Geographic Chapters book each year to my class and they have all been wonderful.

#7: Love That Dog

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During our poetry unit, I pull this book out. During the first few pages, I get a lot of bewildered books. My students ask, “Is this really a chapter book?” “This is poetry?” “What kind of book is this?” It’s about a kid who isn’t a fan of poetry. Over time, the kid slowly realizes that poetry doesn’t have a set style or a list of requirements. It’s different for everyone and it’s a very personal thing. It’s a powerful book that had a few of my kids tearing up at the end. Love it!

#8: Stranded

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This series has five books so far that leave you hanging on the edge of your seat. If you’re looking to give your students the ultimate cliffhanger each time you stop reading, this is the series for you. Stranded is written by the host of Survivor. It’s about four kids who are step-siblings that go on vacation with their uncle after their parents get married. They end up getting stranded on a deserted island with no adults to help them. The four kids have to learn to survive using the little knowledge they have while they wait to be rescued. Every chapter had my third graders on the edge of their seat. Every student in the classroom can relate to one of the four kids on the island. There are wild animals, skeletons, disasters, storms, treasure, and more! Definitely one of my favorite third grade read alouds!

#9: The Land of Stories

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This series is LONG but well-worth it! Each book is about 400 pages long but is filled with adventure. The series is about a twin boy and girl who end up falling into a fairy-tale land called The Land of Stories. In the story, they find magical people from the stories they grew up reading–Red Riding Hood, Jack from the Beanstalk, Cinderella, Snow White, and so many more. In the first book, the twins have to figure out a way out of the storybook that leads them back to the real world while trying to avoid the Evil Witch at the same time. My class loved the first one so much that we read the second one too! About half of my class bought or went to the library to get the third and fourth books too!

#10: Out of My Mind

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I had the chance to read this in college and the author came to my school to give a book talk as well. I was hooked! It took me a few years to work up the courage to read it to my class because I worried since it’s not hilarious and action-filled that they wouldn’t love it. How wrong I was! Out of My Mind tells the story of Melody, a fifth-grade girl who has cerebral palsy. She can’t walk, talk, feed herself, go to the bathroom by herself, or anything else, but inside her head, she is brilliant. She’s intelligent, smart, capable, witty, and creative. This book captivated my students and gave them a new perspective on people who are different from themselves. It teaches empathy and how to think outside the box. From the first word to the last, they loved it.

Honorable Mentions:

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The Buddy Files is a great book series for students who love a mystery mixed with a little comedy. It’s told from the perspective of a dog who loves all food and is searching for his missing family. My students would read aloud with me when they knew what Buddy the dog was going to say next.

The One and Only Ivan is loved year after year by my third graders. Ivan is a gorilla who is trapped in a mall in a cage and is watched by mall-goers day in and day out. With the help of a little girl, a few elephants, and a dog, his life changes forever.

Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle is an oldie-but-goody! She is an old woman that is adored by all the children in the neighborhood. When a parent is having difficulty getting their child to clean their room or act politely when company is over, they call Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle to ask for advice. She always has an idea of how to help the child in a unusual and typically magical way. It can be a little slow to start, but my kids are normally hooked by the end of the first story.  Each chapter tells about a different child and a different ailment Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle needs to solve.

 

What are your favorite third grade read alouds? I’d love to hear what you read aloud to your class!

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Reading, Uncategorized